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The Craft Scotland Prize

Andrea Walsh / Photography by Slyvain Deleu

Craft Scotland Prize - Visual Arts Scotland - 2019 winner Karlyn Sutherland Glass

2019Karlyn Sutherland

The Craft Scotland Prize 2019 was awarded to Karlyn Sutherland for her piece Harbour Road, Lybster. Karlyn Sutherland graduated with a practice-based Ph.D. in Architecture from the University of Edinburgh in 2014; her research examines the dialogue between the haptic, hands-on acts of making and the human sense of place and attachment. She began working in glass in 2009 when her exploration of these topics led to her enrolment on a master class at North Lands Creative Glass in her hometown of Lybster (Caithness, Scotland). She has since gone on to exhibit both nationally and internationally, with her work playing a critical role in the development of her academic research, and vice-versa. 

Andrea Walsh Contained Boxes Craft Scotland Prize Winner - VAS

2017Andrea Walsh

The Craft Scotland Prize 2017 was awarded to Andrea Walsh for her piece Contained Boxes. Based in Edinburgh, Andrea is an artist who's work is an exploration of the box and vessel form. She explores ideas of containment, materiality, preciousness and value, through considered and exquisitely tactile objects which communicate with the viewer notably through their intimate scale. To create elegantly crafted, timeless and unique pieces, she uses a range of materials including ceramics, glass and metal. 

After completing her master's degree in Glass at Edinburgh College of Art (ECA), she set up her studio in 2005. Andrea's work is included in private and public collections worldwide, including the renowned Victoria & Albert Museum in London, and the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.

Craft Scotland Prize 2016 - Polly Collins

2016Polly Collins

In 2016, we awarded the first The Craft Scotland Prize to an exhibiting craft maker, Polly Collins for her piece 'Slow Dining'. A designer/maker based in Edinburgh, Polly creates functional and speculative objects from metal and wood. Through her collection 'Slow Dining' Polly is considering a world in which we are friends with our utensils, where we want to spend time with them and to nurture them; a place where we slow down a bit. Polly works predominantly in sheet metal, yet treats it like textile; creating seams and gussets into soft forms. She is interested in challenging the expectations of a material; forming a cold, hard material into something comforting and warm.

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